Photographers capture majestic & vibrant S’pore sunset on June 30

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The sunset on the evening of June 30 was a nearly 30-minute-long spectacle, as the sky transitioned between different colours.

Some local photographers shared their snapshots of the setting sun in the CloudSpotting & SkySpotting Singapore Facebook group.

Image from Nicholas Tan Eng Sin/FB.

In case you missed it, here are some photos for your viewing pleasure.

If you’re reading this on a phone, scroll really quickly to watch the sun set.

Sunset on June 30

MacRitchie Reservoir. Image from Aileen Joyce Bernido/FB.

Bedok Reservoir. Image from Soon Tee Lee/FB.

Image from Nicholas Tan Eng Sin/FB.

MacRitchie Reservoir. Image from Aileen Joyce Bernido/FB.

Image from Jagjit Singh Balia/FB.

Image from Elaine Chee/FB.

Image from Teo Nam Siang/FB.

Image from Martin Abbugao/FB.

Image from Gladys Lim/FB.

Image from Martin Abbugao/FB.

Video from Tin Neu/FB.

Image from Samuel Lifeng Leong/FB.

Image from Gladys Lim/FB.

Video from P Hong Ong/FB.

Bedok Reservoir. Image from Soon Tee Lee/FB.

Image from Raymond Fong/FB.

Image from Raymond Fong/FB.

Image from Ly Eng/FB.

Image from P Hong Ong/FB.

Image from Pauline Ang/FB.

From Jurong. Image from Jeanne F. Genodia/FB.

From Jurong. Image from Jeanne F. Genodia/FB.

Image from Yan Sim/FB.

Image from Yan Sim/FB.

Rayleigh scattering

The different colours in a sunset are a result of a phenomenon known as Rayleigh scattering – the scattering of light from the sun as it travels through the Earth’s atmosphere.

Sunlight, or visible light, comprises all of the rainbow’s seven colours, and different colours of light rays have varying wavelengths.

Lights of shorter wavelengths, such as violet, blue and green, are more likely to get scattered away and bounce off our sight.

Conversely, those with longer wavelengths, such as red and orange, are less likely to get scattered and will travel through air to reach our eyes.

When the sun is setting, light passes through a longer distance and therefore red and orange rays are the ones that we predominantly see at this time of the day.

As warm and humid weather is expected to continue in Singapore, you can expect to see more of such majestic spectacles.

Besides the level of the air’s humidity, another factor that affect the colours of a sunset or sunrise is the quality of the air.

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